Make Noise have just released the new version of Rene – an update to the original Rene from 2009, which, according to Modular Grid, is the most popular Eurorack sequencer and one of the most popular eurorack modules overall. The original Rene introduced the concept of Cartesian, or X/Y, or GRID based sequencing, which is a method of sequencing, where rather than going through steps sequentially, as is done in traditional sequencers, you can go back and forth, up, down, left or right, or in any angle or number of steps, and in any direction on a grid of locations.   What’s new? The newRead More →

A few years ago 1010Music released Bitbox – a simplified but extremely powerful Ableton-Live style sampler, slicer and clip launcher – by far the most advanced Eurorack sampler I’ve ever seen. Where it gets a little confusing is that since then they’ve released two completely different firmware versions for the same hardware – Fxbox and Synthbox, which transform it into radically different modules. I’m not talking about just updates with new features (which have also come out separately), but rather alternate firmware versions with entirely different functionality. In parallel, they’ve released independent modules with said firmware versions, which can also load each other’s firmware. So,Read More →

Maths by Make Noise is by far the #1 eurorack module on Modular Grid – both in terms of rating and popularity. In this video, I explain what Maths is and why it’s so popular. Maths sounds complicated and if you’ve heard some of the terms used to describe it – an analog computer, a function generator and various other quadratic equations, it may seem a bit intimidating, but overall, it has three core components: attentuverters, a mixer and slew rate limiters. It is however the combination of these things, which a few bonus features, that makes Maths such a versatile module. In this clipRead More →

Delay is one of the most popular audio effects, and understandably so.  In this clip I review EuroDDL, as well as use its various CV interfaces to create a chorus/flange effects, a delayed harmonizer, apply a PWM-like effect to a synth that doesn’t have that feature, loop drums and, since there’s a built in filter, create percussive Karplus-Strong sounds. While the concept of delay is simple – recording a snippet of sound and playing it back continuously, done at different delay times – delay can have a dramatic effect on your sound. Timed to the tempo of a song, delay can take a simple riffRead More →

The Subharmonicon is a lovely, interesting and different synth from Moog. Only around 100 were hand soldered and built at Moogfest’s 2018 Engineering Workshop, and there’s no information currently about whether it will be released commercially. Even though availability is scarce, I decided to put together a review of this instrument, because the way it works is such a breath of fresh air when it comes to sound generation and sequencing. Also, one would hope that Moog will eventually mass produce the Subharmonicon, as they did for most, but not all past Engineer Workshop projects, like the DFAM and Werkstatt. This review includes an interviewRead More →

The Behringer Model D is a great analog synth – and by design it’s monophonic. However, if you’ve seen my channel before, you know I’m not going to let that stop me from trying to play more than one note at a time with it, something that has a unique characteristic in synthesizers that are intended to be monophonic. You can’t control any of its 3 oscillators separately, but there’s a fourth oscillator that can be controlled independently, and that’s the filter – via a dedicated CV input – and when you crank up emphasis all the way, it resonates and creates its own tone.Read More →

The Behringer Model D is an homage (or clone, depending on your point of view…) to the classic and legendary Minimoog Model D. Behringer’s main achievement, aside from creating a faithful and great sounding synth, is pricing it at $300. In this video I review some of the “cons” of this synth, and the many “pros” that make it a very enjoyable synthesizer.Read More →

I recently received for review the VariFO, a new and relatively cheap quad LFO module from VoicAs – a new eurorack company. With so many LFOs on tap, it inspired me to put together a clip with beginner as well as more advanced and creative LFO uses. In this clip I explain what an LFO is, demonstrate how its basic parameters work (depth, rate, shape), and show ten different things you can do with LFOs: 1. Tremolo 2. Vibrato 3. FM synthesis 4. A Wobble effect with two LFOs 5. How an LFO can also be used as a clock or trigger in a modular setupRead More →

In my review of DFAM and the comparison to Mother-32, I mentioned a few features that Mother-32 had and DFAM didn’t. The ability to have different length sequences – either less or more than 8 steps, the ability to sequence notes, not just continuous pitches, an LFO, glide and ratchets. And as you know me, if a feature is on my wishlist, I’m going to do my best to make it happen. This video focuses on the beauty of eurorack and semi-modular synths – where either through internal patching or with the help of a handful of modules, you can get almost everything you want.Read More →

The most obvious feature of Polyend’s SEQ sequencer is the 8-track, 32-step grid, along with a great looking aluminum and oak exterior. However, the abundance of control and charm come at a steep price. Is it worth it? In this video I give a thorough in depth look at SEQ, and it’s companion MIDI to CV eurorack module POLY, testing the sequencing of hardware, modular and software instruments. On the software side, sequencing is quite simple. SEQ can send MIDI data via USB and supports sequencing on 16 separate MIDI channels, nicely controlling Spitfire Audio’s Albion One orchestra. On the hardware side, I test SEQ’sRead More →